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High burden of schistosomiasis in pre-school-age children in Chikhwawa district

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PHD StudentDaily use of water like this increase risk of bilhaziaA newly published paper on schistosomiasis in children, by Dr. Helen Poole and colleagues, has found a considerable burden of the disease in young children in Chikhwawa district, highlighting the need for a more in-depth evaluation of the scale of the problem in young children in Malawi. Young children are currently not included in the national Malawi schistosomiasis control programme, which provides mass drug treatment with praziquantel (MDA) to school-aged children only.

Dr Helen Poole (who came to MLW as an LSTM MSc student) and MLW field staff examined pre-school-age children (PSAC) below 5 years of age and their mothers in Chikhwawa district. They found that approximately half of the examined pre-school-age children were infected and identified both urogenital and intestinal forms.

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Similarities between the eye retina and brain could help understanding of Cerebral Malaria

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Figure 1 low res 2In a newly published review paper on cerebral malaria in children, Dr. Ian MacCormick and colleagues, conclude that the retina could be a useful tool to better understand cerebral malaria and may lead to improved treatment.


Cerebral malaria is a dangerous illness for children in Malawi, and a frequent cause of death. Despite many years of research, it is still not entirely clear what happens in cerebral malaria that causes some children to die while others survive. This is partly because it is difficult to study the brain - the brain is inside the skull and it is not easy to reach with a microscope or other tools often used in medical research.  

 

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PhD student wins international prize

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PHD StudentEmanuele Giorgi has become the European winner of the Young Statistician’s Showcase prize of the International Biometric Society's world conference, winning a  $3000 prize for his research paper on malaria prevalence mapping aimed at fighting malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.


Emanuele, who is doing a PhD in Statistics and Epidemiology at Lancaster University with supervisors Professor Peter Diggle and Dr. Anja Terlouw from MLW, has developed a new statistical method to improve malaria burden estimations from surveillance data. As part of his PhD he has spent several months in Malawi at MLW.