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PhD student wins international prize

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PHD StudentEmanuele Giorgi has become the European winner of the Young Statistician’s Showcase prize of the International Biometric Society's world conference, winning a  $3000 prize for his research paper on malaria prevalence mapping aimed at fighting malaria in sub-Saharan Africa.


Emanuele, who is doing a PhD in Statistics and Epidemiology at Lancaster University with supervisors Professor Peter Diggle and Dr. Anja Terlouw from MLW, has developed a new statistical method to improve malaria burden estimations from surveillance data. As part of his PhD he has spent several months in Malawi at MLW.

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HIV Self-testing gets positive response in Blantyre

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HIV Self-testing gets positive response in BlantyreA cluster randomized trial in Blantyre by Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust (MLW) and College of Medicine, which commenced in 2010, has shown that more people are willing to do self testing for HIV within the confines of their homes.
 

The study reveals that people prefer self testing, because of its privacy and convenience. So far 12,970 people recorded in the study are reported to have done self-testing within the townships of Ndirande, Likhubula and Chilomoni in Blantyre, representing a 78 percent uptake of self-testing.

According to the Trial Coordinator Augustine Choko, people including community leaders have welcomed the study which commenced in 2010 for many reasons.

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Men at risk of reporting late to care facilities for TB diagnosis

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Men like these are being encouraged to report to hospital quickly when they have TB symptomsHIV Self-testing gets positive response in BlantyreStudy findings have revealed that men could be reporting to care facilities late resulting in delayed Tuberculosis diagnosis, thereby contributing to on-going transmission of the disease in community. The study which was conducted in 2011 by Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust and Malawi College of Medicine researchers in Blantyre, in conjunction with the Human Sciences Research Council in South Africa, attributes men’s behaviour to several factors including their expectations and roles to provide for the family

.According to Jeremiah Chikovore, Principle Investigator of the study, men don’t want to be seen lying down as a result of an illness, nor can they afford to spend long hours seeking care when they would rather be working to support their families.